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Odyssey Podcasts

 

Welcome to the Odyssey Podcasts. These podcasts are excerpts from lectures given by guest writers, editors, and agents at the Odyssey Writing Workshop.

Every month or two, we release a new podcast. Each one is ten to fifteen minutes long. You may download a particular podcast, or you may subscribe to the podcasts so you automatically receive them when they are released. To subscribe, you will need RSS reader software on your computer. There are many free RSS readers.

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If you have iTunes, you can subscribe on the iTunes page for Odyssey Podcasts.

Or see below to download and listen to individual podcasts. To access more options, right-click on the mp3 links.




PODCAST #96

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Patricia Bray was a guest lecturer at the 2016 Odyssey Writing Workshop, where she lectured on researching your story elements. This excerpt is part 1 of two parts. In it, Patricia discusses why research matters, how it influences your story, how the type of research you do depends on the type of story you want to tell, different ways of doing research, and common pitfalls. Why does research matter? The author needs to create a bond of trust with the reader. When the reader recognizes incorrect information, he loses faith in the author. Research underpins everything--character, setting, plot, worldbuilding. It's obvious when an author hasn't done good research. Characters have to fit into the world. The plot has to make sense in the context of the culture and world. Research can vary by genre. For example, if the zombies in your story are caused by a virus and that's important, you'll need medical and scientific research. The amount of research necessary will vary based on the length of the piece and how central the element is to your story. It's also important to consider what the characters know in the time and place where they live. Don't assume they know what we do and have the same thoughts we do.

Patricia Bray Patricia Bray is the author of a dozen novels, including Devlin's Luck, which won the Compton Crook Award for the best first novel in the field of science fiction or fantasy. A multi-genre author whose career spans both epic fantasy and Regency romance, her books have been translated into Russian, German, Portuguese and Hebrew. She's also crossed over to the dark side as the co-editor of After Hours: Tales from the Ur-Bar (DAW, March 2011) and The Modern Fae's Guide to Surviving Humanity (DAW, March 2012), Clockwork Universe: Steampunk vs. Aliens (ZNB, June 2014) and Temporally Out of Order (ZNB, August 2015).

Patricia lives in a New England college town, where she combines her writing with a full-time career in I/T. To offset the hours spent at a keyboard, she bikes, hikes, cross-country skis, snowshoes and has recently taken up the noble sport of curling. To find out more, visit her website at www.patriciabray.com.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2016 by Patricia Bray. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #95

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Scott H. Andrews, 2005 Odyssey Writing Workshop graduate and publisher of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2016. This excerpt is the second of two parts. In it, Scott focuses on rejections. Authors need to know that rejections aren't personal. While Scott doesn't use form rejections, many magazine editors do. There are many reasons an editor might do that. The editor may want to respond quickly, may not have anything to say, or may have something to say that would be too time consuming. It's not the editor's job to give you a free critique. Scott discourages authors from spending time trying to interpret the hidden meaning behind the rejection letter through wording, punctuation, or response time, a process known as "rejectomancy." The underlying reason for almost all rejections is that the story didn't compel the editor to keep reading. There are a few useful pieces of information an author may glean from a rejection. If the story gets passed up from the slush reader to the editor, it can mean your story stood out. If the response takes longer than usual, or get comments that indicate the editor read all the way to end, that could mean the editor liked the story more than usual. Editors don't read all stories all the way to the end; they read only until they know the story is not right for the magazine. Scott advises authors not to get upset about odd or snarky comments in a rejection. Editors write these quickly and don't agonize over each word. It's a bad idea to reply to a rejection, beyond a quick thank you. Never argue with a rejection. And remember that it's not personal, so try not to take it personally.

Scott H. Andrews Scott H. Andrews lives in Virginia with his wife, two cats, nine guitars, a dozen overflowing bookcases, and hundreds of beer bottles from all over the world. He writes, teaches college chemistry, and is Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of the three-time Hugo Award finalist and World Fantasy Award-winning online fantasy magazine Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

Scott is a graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop; his literary short fiction has won a $1000 prize from the Briar Cliff Review, and his genre short fiction has appeared in Space & Time, Crossed Genres, and Ann VanderMeer's Weird Tales.

He has lectured on short fiction, secondary-world fantasy, editing, magazine publishing, audio podcasting, and beer on dozens of convention panels at multiple Worldcons, World Fantasy conventions, and regional conventions in the Northeast and Midwest. He is a three-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award, and he celebrates International Stout Day at least once a year.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2016 by Scott H. Andrews. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #94

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Scott H. Andrews, 2005 Odyssey Writing Workshop graduate and publisher of Beneath Ceaseless Skies, was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2016. This excerpt is the first of two parts. In it, Scott discusses magazine submissions. He discusses the number of submissions received each month by BCS and other publications, and explains that slush readers read quickly, so a story must make an immediate impression. When submitting, authors should be professional. They should be familiar with the market they're submitting to and read the guidelines. Cover letters are not a big deal. Sometimes editors skim or skip them. But when presenting yourself, think about going on a blind date. Don't wear sweatpants or a tux. Don't be full of yourself or overeager. Keep it short and simple. Don't summarize your story. List 1-3 good credits at most; don't list lots of minor sales. Also don't inflate your credits. The story is what matters. If you've attended Odyssey or other workshops, mention those. Let the editor know if this is a simultaneous submission. If you met the editor at a convention or elsewhere, remind him of that. That can help you get passed up from the slush reader to the head editor, so he will be making the decision. Don't freak out about submitting your work, and you'll be fine.

Scott H. Andrews Scott H. Andrews lives in Virginia with his wife, two cats, nine guitars, a dozen overflowing bookcases, and hundreds of beer bottles from all over the world. He writes, teaches college chemistry, and is Editor-in-Chief and Publisher of the three-time Hugo Award finalist and World Fantasy Award-winning online fantasy magazine Beneath Ceaseless Skies.

Scott is a graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop; his literary short fiction has won a $1000 prize from the Briar Cliff Review, and his genre short fiction has appeared in Space & Time, Crossed Genres, and Ann VanderMeer's Weird Tales.

He has lectured on short fiction, secondary-world fantasy, editing, magazine publishing, audio podcasting, and beer on dozens of convention panels at multiple Worldcons, World Fantasy conventions, and regional conventions in the Northeast and Midwest. He is a three-time finalist for the World Fantasy Award, and he celebrates International Stout Day at least once a year.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2016 by Scott H. Andrews. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #93

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This lecture excerpt, from writer-in-residence Kij Johnson at Odyssey 2015, discusses scale and complexity. How big is your story going to be? This is one of the first decisions a writer makes. Any story can be made as long or short as you want, but the length changes the nature of the story. If you're trying to tell a big story in a few words, you will lose details and specificity, the qualities at the heart of story. Reading is a linear, immersive experience. The author must tell everything in one long skinny string. The reader can only experience the story minute by minute, word by word. The writer is controlling this experience; writing is a supremely manipulative art. If the writer is not aware of that, then the writer is writing like a reader, which doesn't work well. The author needs to be in control of every word, to have reason for each word and not just meander along. One could tell The Lord of the Rings in 3,000 words, but it's a big story about big events that will take place across the world. If the world is changing or the character is changing in substantial ways, you probably need more words or will be missing some of the meat. Complexity is heart of fiction. Bring complexity that operates on many levels. If you are writing simple stories, why? Why not engage with complexity? Complexity allows complicated feelings, major themes, and higher topics. Nothing is simple. A story needs to be bigger than its container, not bigger in content but in theme. Characters can gain complexity through internal conflict, such as the conflict between what they want and what they think they want, between what they want and what they have, between what they want and the fact that what they want comes with what they don't want.

Kij Johnson Kij Johnson is widely considered one of the top fantasy/science fiction writing teachers in the country. She is the author of three novels—two fantasies set in classical Japan, The Fox Woman and Fudoki, and a Star Trek:The Next Generation novel—and a short story collection, At the Mouth of the River of Bees. Since 2008, her short fiction has won the Nebula Award (three times), the Hugo, and the World Fantasy Award. In the past she has worked in book publishing, comic books and graphic novels, RPGs and trading card games; managed development and tech-writing groups for Seattle-area tech firms; edited cryptic crosswords; identified Napa cabernets by winery and year while blindfolded; and bouldered an occasional V-5. She received her Master of Fine Arts from North Carolina State University, and teaches at the University of Kansas, where she is associate director for the Center for the Study of Science Fiction. She splits her time between Seattle and Lawrence.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2015 by Kij Johnson. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #92

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Alma Alexander was a guest lecturer at the 2015 Odyssey Writing Workshop. In this excerpt from her lecture on character, Alma talks about unexpected characters that show up in your story. They can be a gift, but you need to make sure you understand their role in the story and you know whose story you're telling. Sometimes you can get stuck when you have the wrong protagonist or are telling the story from the wrong point of view. Usually the protagonist should have the most to gain or lose. The protagonist should be solving or failing to solve the problem through his own agency. You shouldn't have someone else riding in to save the day. The protagonist needs to be active, to push back against the world. Thinking about how characters function in pairs can be very helpful. Sometimes one character can set another off. One character can let another shine. Be careful if your sidekick becomes too prominent, though. One important tool to develop a character is his voice. You need to hear the character inside your head. If you find yourself using inflections and phrasings you wouldn't use, then the character is coming to life. While you should know a lot about your characters, most of that information doesn't need to go into the story. You don't need to explain why the character is the way he is; you can just show his character in action. Taking the character out of his normal context can help to reveal the character by his response.

Alma Alexander Alma Alexander's life so far has prepared her very well for her chosen career. She was born in a country which no longer exists on the maps, has lived and worked in seven countries on four continents (and in cyberspace!), has climbed mountains, dived in coral reefs, flown small planes, swum with dolphins, and touched two-thousand-year-old tiles in a gate out of Babylon. She is a novelist, anthologist and short story writer who currently shares her life between the Pacific Northwest of the USA (where she lives with her husband and two cats) and the wonderful fantasy worlds of her own imagination. You can find out more about Alma on her website (www.AlmaAlexander.org), her Facebook page (https://www.facebook.com/pages/Alma-Alexander/67938071280) or her blog (http://anghara.livejournal.com).

The text of this recording is copyright © 2015 by Alma Deckert. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #91

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As writer-in-residence at Odyssey 2015, Kij Johnson gave some fascinating lectures. This podcast is an excerpt from Kij's lecture on choosing and prioritizing descriptive detail. Kij explains that you have to pick the thread of the reader's experience. You can't describe everything. This strand moves in one direction only as the reader reads it. In reality, people access all information at once, but the reader reads only one detail at a time, so you need to sort and prioritize those details. Kij discusses the four element of description: (1) perfect detail, (2) how information is acquired, (3) the prioritization of information, and (4) what else the author wants you to know. It can often be best to give details in the order the character perceives them. You can reveal things about both the character and the world with details. Regarding #2, consider the nature of the different senses. For example, smell, touching, and taste require closeness. The character can also move through the environment to acquire information. For #3, prioritization, you need to consider who the character is, what's happening, the degree of urgency. For #4, you can convey themes, counterthemes, and foreshadowing by embedding it description.

Kij Johnson Kij Johnson is widely considered one of the top fantasy/science fiction writing teachers in the country. She is the author of three novels—two fantasies set in classical Japan, The Fox Woman and Fudoki, and a Star Trek:The Next Generation novel—and a short story collection, At the Mouth of the River of Bees. Since 2008, her short fiction has won the Nebula Award (three times), the Hugo, and the World Fantasy Award. In the past she has worked in book publishing, comic books and graphic novels, RPGs and trading card games; managed development and tech-writing groups for Seattle-area tech firms; edited cryptic crosswords; identified Napa cabernets by winery and year while blindfolded; and bouldered an occasional V-5. She received her Master of Fine Arts from North Carolina State University, and teaches at the University of Kansas, where she is associate director for the Center for the Study of Science Fiction. She splits her time between Seattle and Lawrence.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2015 by Kij Johnson. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #90

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Kij Johnson was the writer-in-residence at Odyssey 2015, providing a week of great lectures, advice, and feedback on student manuscripts. This podcast is an excerpt from her lecture on description. Kij explains that description is all about the details. The author needs to keep the reader on the string of story by leading them from knot to knot. The story can't always have big plot moments, but details can build a sequential, immersive experience. With the right details, the reader will see and hear what the author wants her to see and hear. The author needs to find ways to thicken the reader's sense of the string. Consider different sensory input, and consider the point of view character. What she notices should be specific to who she is. If the point of view character is unfamiliar with the environment, she will notice more things. If the character is familiar with the environment, she will notice things that have changed or things relevant to her circumstance. The author needs to find ways--ideally exciting, compelling ways--to include information that the POV character wouldn't notice. It's often better to describe the environment as the character interacts with it. Details can be included as they become important to the character.

Kij Johnson Kij Johnson is widely considered one of the top fantasy/science fiction writing teachers in the country. She is the author of three novels—two fantasies set in classical Japan, The Fox Woman and Fudoki, and a Star Trek:The Next Generation novel—and a short story collection, At the Mouth of the River of Bees. Since 2008, her short fiction has won the Nebula Award (three times), the Hugo, and the World Fantasy Award. In the past she has worked in book publishing, comic books and graphic novels, RPGs and trading card games; managed development and tech-writing groups for Seattle-area tech firms; edited cryptic crosswords; identified Napa cabernets by winery and year while blindfolded; and bouldered an occasional V-5. She received her Master of Fine Arts from North Carolina State University, and teaches at the University of Kansas, where she is associate director for the Center for the Study of Science Fiction. She splits her time between Seattle and Lawrence.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2015 by Kij Johnson. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



PODCAST #89

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Brendan DuBois was a guest lecturer at the 2015 Odyssey Writing Workshop, where he spoke on the Fantastic World of the Short Story. Brendan gives a brief account of the history of the SF short story and explains how developing writers can profit from starting with short stories. Writing short stories allows you to set goals and finish things. It allows you to experiment with all aspects of writing and learn from each one. Short stories can help you get used to rejection, which is a critical part of the writing process. Brendan has had 149 stories published and triple that number of rejections. Writing short stories is also a great way to make sales and get contacts with editors, agents, and other authors. Brendan explains his liquor store robbery theory of short fiction: know your target, hit them hard, don't waste time, and when you're done, get out. Brendan advises that if you have an idea for a story, figure out the plotline and characters before you begin to write. It's critical to limit your ingredients to keep the story from turning into a novel. Quickly get your character into trouble and worsen it with each paragraph. Making your character struggle emotionally, psychologically, and physically makes the reader identify with him. Once you've finished a draft, allow yourself to acknowledge what is working and what's not working, so you can make it better.

Brendan DuBois Award-winning mystery, suspense and science-fiction author Brendan DuBois is a former newspaper reporter and a lifelong resident of New Hampshire, where he lives with his wife Mona, their hell-raising cat Bailey, and one happy English Springer Spaniel named Spencer.

He is currently at work on his seventeenth novel, a variety of new short stories, as well as other writing projects. His latest Lewis Cole novel, Fatal Harbor, was published in May 2014. Last year, he published his science fiction trilogy, The Empire of the North, made up of The Noble Warrior, The Noble Prisoner, and The Noble Prince. His recent thriller, Twilight, received a starred review from Publisher's Weekly. DuBois has been published in ten countries by such publishers as St. Martin's Press; Little, Brown; Time Warner UK; Houghton Mifflin; Pegasus Books, and many more.

His most widely published suspense-thriller, Resurrection Day, has received world-wide acclaim. It takes place in October 1972, ten years after the Cuban Missile Crisis erupted into a full-scale atomic war, destroying the Soviet Union and decimating the United States. Called "one of the most inventive novels of alternative history since Robert Harris' Fatherland," Resurrection Day is a chilling tale of what might have been. At the 58th World Science Fiction Convention in Chicago, Resurrection Day received the Sidewise Award for Best Alternative History Novel.

DuBois has had more than 120 short stories published in such magazines as Playboy, Mary Higgins Clark Mystery Magazine, Ellery Queen's Mystery Magazine, Alfred Hitchcock's Mystery Magazine, and the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, as well as in numerous original short fiction anthologies.

His short fiction has been included in many Year's Best anthologies. Most recently, his short story "A Ticket Out" was included in Best American Noir Stories of the Century, edited by James Ellroy and Otto Penzler. In June 2000, DuBois was honored when one of his short stories, "The Dark Snow," was published in the anthology Best American Mystery Stories of the Century. Other authors in that anthology included Raymond Chandler, O. Henry, Flannery O'Connor, and John Steinbeck. His work has also appeared in the 1988, 1990, 1992 and 1995 editions of The Year's Best Mystery & Suspense Stories, the 1995 and 1997 editions of Year's 25 Best Mystery Short Stories, the 1997, 1999, 2001 and 2003 editions of Best American Mystery Stories, and the 2001, 2002, 2003, and 2004 editions of The World's Finest Mystery and Crime Stories, published by Forge.

His short fiction has twice won the Shamus Award from the Private Eye Writers of America, twice won the Barry Award for Best Mystery Short Story of the Year, won the Al Blanchard Crime Fiction Award for Best Short Crime Fiction Story, has been nominated three times for an Edgar Allan Poe Award from the Mystery Writers of America, and has been nominated for the Anthony Award for Best Mystery Short Story of the Year.

He is also a one-time Jeopardy! game show champion.

The text of this recording is copyright © 2015 by Brendan DuBois. The sound recording is copyright ℗ 2016 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.



FOR PODCASTS #1-22, CLICK HERE.

FOR PODCASTS #23-44, CLICK HERE.

FOR PODCASTS #45-66, CLICK HERE.

FOR PODCASTS #67-88, CLICK HERE.

 

 

 


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