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Odyssey Podcasts

 

Welcome to the Odyssey Podcasts. These podcasts are excerpts from lectures given by guest writers, editors, and agents at the Odyssey Writing Workshop.

Every month or two, we release a new podcast. Each one is ten to fifteen minutes long. You may download a particular podcast, or you may subscribe to the podcasts so you automatically receive them when they are released. To subscribe, you will need RSS reader software on your computer. There are many free RSS readers; if you have a gmail account, you can use Google Reader.

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Or see below to download and listen to individual podcasts. To access more options, right-click on the mp3 links.




FOR THE MOST RECENT PODCASTS, CLICK HERE.

FOR PODCASTS #23-44, CLICK HERE.

FOR PODCASTS #45-66, CLICK HERE.



PODCAST #22

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Nancy Kress was the writer-in-residence at Odyssey 2008. Nancy delivered a week of amazing lectures, provided in-depth feedback on student manuscripts, and met privately with students. In this podcast, Nancy discusses writing in scenes, the concept that turned her own stories from non-salable to salable. Nancy explains that stories should be structured in scenes, and that each scene should have its own purpose. She breaks scenes into five modes of expression: dialogue, description, action, character's thoughts, and exposition. Nancy explains why dialogue should be at the heart of almost all scenes. She also discusses the importance of the "surround"--the other four modes that are interspersed with the dialogue--and through a series of examples, illustrates how the dialogue and the surround interact to create meaning.

Nancy Kress Nancy Kress is the author of twenty-three books: three fantasy novels, eleven SF novels, two thrillers, three collections of short stories, one YA novel, and three books on writing fiction. She is perhaps best known for the "Sleepless" trilogy that began with Beggars in Spain. The novel was based on a Nebula- and Hugo-winning novella of the same name; the series then continued with Beggars and Choosers and Beggars Ride. The trilogy explores questions of genetic engineering, social structure, and what society's "haves" owe its "have-nots." In 2008 three Kress books will appear: a collection of short stories, Nano Comes to Clifford Falls and Other Stories (Golden Gryphon Press), and two novels, Steal Across the Sky (Tor) and Dogs (Tachyon).

Kress's short fiction has won three Nebulas and a Hugo, and her novel Probability Space won the 2003 John W. Campbell Award. Her work has been translated into eighteen languages. She lives in Rochester, New York, with the world's most spoiled toy poodle.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2008 by Nancy Kress. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2009 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #21

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Melissa Scott was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2006, where she delivered a major lecture on worldbuilding. Some of Melissa's most important points are included in two podcasts. You can listen to part 1 of Melissa's discussion of worldbuilding in Podcast #5. Here, in part 2, Melissa explores the various ways you can show your world to the reader without stopping the story to explain. The protagonist may travel through the world, so the reader can learn about its different regions as the protagonist travels. Or the protagonist may be a stranger to the world, so character and reader learn together. Low-context conversation offers another opportunity to insert information. Other, less subtle techniques involve quoting from fictional "texts" from your world or describing advertisements or newscasts. Melissa explains how point of view can control the way the reader sees the world and can offer additional opportunities to explain your world.

Melissa Scott Melissa Scott is from Little Rock, Arkansas, and studied history at Harvard College and Brandeis University, where she earned her Ph.D. in the comparative history program with a dissertation titled "The Victory of the Ancients: Tactics, Technology, and the Use of Classical Precedent." In 1986, she won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and in 2001 she and her late partner and long-time collaborator Lisa A. Barnett won the Lambda Literary Award in SF/Fantasy/Horror for Point of Dreams. Scott has also won Lammies in 1996 for Shadow Man and 1995 for Trouble and Her Friends, having previously been a three-time finalist (for Mighty Good Road, Dreamships, and Burning Bright). Trouble and Her Friends was also shortlisted for the Tiptree. Her most recent solo novel, The Jazz, was named to Locus's Recommended Reading List for 2000. Her first work of nonfiction, Conceiving the Heavens: Creating the Science Fiction Novel, was published by Heinemann in 1997, and her monologue, "At RaeDean's Funeral," has been included in an off-off-Broadway production, Elvis Dreams, as well as several other evenings of Elvis-mania. A second monologue, "Job Hunting," has been performed in competition and as a part of an evening of Monologues from the Road. Her most recent publications are the short stories "The Rocky Side of the Sky" (in Periphery, Alice Street) and "Mister Seeley" (in So Fey, Haworth Press).

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Melissa Scott. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #20

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James Maxey was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2008. During his visit, James shared the struggles and successes of his writing career and offered a lot of great advice to developing writers. In this podcast, James explains that editors don't judge a piece by a new writer the same way they judge a piece by a successful writer. Because a new writer has to prove his competence, a strong opening is critical. To create a strong opening, an author must engage multiple senses and provide vivid descriptions to bring the reader into the story. James reviews the many tasks that an opening must accomplish and explores some of the ways that the author can accomplish these tasks. He describes some of the traps that authors fall into when writing openings. He also reveals a simple and powerful technique to draw the reader in and reveal key information in an opening.

James Maxey James Maxey is the author of the Dragon Age trilogy published by Solaris Books. Set on a world ruled by dragons where humans are little more than slaves, pets, or prey, the Dragon Age trilogy tells the overarching story of mankind's struggle for freedom from the rule of dragons, though each novel stands alone as a complete story. The first book of the trilogy, Bitterwood (2007), tells the story of the eponymous dragon-slayer and the consequences that follow his murder of the dragon-king's beloved son. The second book, Dragon Forge (2008), explores an epic tale of love set against the backdrop of a kingdom in violent turmoil. The final book, Dragon Road (2009) follows the adventures of a band of unlikely heroes as they struggle to save the world as the Dragon Age draws to a close.

James Maxey first broke into the publishing world in 2002 when he won a Phobos Award for his short story "Empire of Dreams and Miracles." Phobos Books later published James's debut novel, the cult-classic superhero tale Nobody Gets the Girl. His short stories have since appeared in Asimov's, Intergalactic Medicine Show, and numerous anthologies.

James is a graduate of the Odyssey Writing Workshop in 1998, where he studied with writer-in-residence Harlan Ellison. In 2001, he attended Orson Scott Card's Writers Boot Camp.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2008 by James Maxey. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #19

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Barry B. Longyear was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2008. In his lecture, Barry talked about the many obstacles that stand between a writer and his writing, and how one can overcome those obstacles and use them to write powerful and original fiction. In this podcast, Barry tackles the part of the writing process that is most difficult for many writers: revision. He discusses his own early struggles with revision, and how he turned the trauma of revision into a joy. He offers a positive, no-nonsense philosophy of revision that can help a writer make his story the best it can be. Barry also discusses the importance of staying true to yourself and writing your own unique stories, rather than writing for particular editors or markets. As Barry says, "Don't write somebody else's stories."

Barry B. Longyear Barry B. Longyear is the first writer to win the Nebula Award, the Hugo Award, and the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer in the same year (may still be the only one for all he knows). In addition to his acclaimed Enemy Mine series, from which the motion picture of the same name was derived, his works include numerous short stories, the Circus World series, Infinity Hold series, a mainstream recovery novel Saint Mary Blue, Yesterday's Tomorrow: Recovery Meditations For Hard Cases, and science fiction and fantasy novels ranging from Sea Of Glass to The God Box. His more recent works include The Write Stuff, his online how-to-write seminar, and the omnibus editions: The Enemy Papers (Enemy Mine, The Tomorrow Testament, The Last Enemy, and The Talman), and Infinity Hold\3 (Infinity Hold, Kill All The Lawyers, and Keep The Law). He has completed training in becoming a private investigator, and is applying this knowledge in his award-winning Jaggers and Shad SF mystery series currently appearing in Analog Science Fiction and Fact magazine.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2008 by Barry B. Longyear. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #18

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Craig Shaw Gardner was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2008. In his lecture, "Being Funny for Money: Humor in Speculative Fiction," Craig offered some great examples of humor in fantasy and science fiction and discussed the business side of writing humor. In this podcast, Craig explains the contribution that humor can make to any story, offering a respite from tension, humanizing characters. Craig also explores the ingredients of humor, including a character with a clear goal who takes his situation seriously. He explains how the author must set up expectations and then knock them down, and he provides invaluable tips for making your humor funnier. He also shows how you can use humor to build your career and promote your writing.

Craig Shaw Gardner Craig Shaw Gardner has published over thirty novels ranging from his first, A Malady of Magics, to the Changeling War fantasy trilogy, written by "Peter Garrison," to the horror novel Dark Whispers, written by "Chris Blaine." Along the way, he's done a number of media tie-ins, one of which--the novelization of Batman--became a New York Times bestseller. He's also the author of more than forty short horror and fantasy stories, which have mostly appeared in original anthologies. Gardner has also served as both President and Trustee for the Horror Writers Association. You can find more information about Craig at www.craigshawgardner.com.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2008 by Craig Shaw Gardner. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #17

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Shawna McCarthy was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2006. Shawna shared valuable information about her experiences as editor of Realms of Fantasy magazine and her experiences as a literary agent. In this podcast, Shawna discusses what she looks for in stories for the magazine, the number of stories she buys each year, the number that are submitted, and what sort of submissions she receives. Since only 1% of submissions are published in the magazine, a story may have nothing wrong with it yet still not be accepted for the magazine. Shawna stresses that in short fiction, every word must count, every sentence, every scene. She also talks about the difficulty of doing high fantasy well in the short form and making it fresh. Shawna gives advice on the types of stories she's looking for, and talks about the types of stories she sees way too often. She also cautions writers not to mistake overwriting for description or style or character, and stresses the need to grab the reader--and the editor--immediately.

Shawna McCarthy Shawna McCarthy has been working in the publishing industry for over twenty years, starting as an editorial assistant at Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and eventually becoming its editor in 1983. She won a Hugo Award as Best Professional Editor in 1984 for her work at Asimov's. From Asimov's she moved to Bantam Spectra as Senior Editor, where she acquired and edited books by Connie Willis, Robert Charles Wilson, Michaela Roessner-Herman, William Gibson and Dan Simmons, among others. After a leave to have her first child (Cayley, now 17), she went back to work as Senior Editor at Workman Publishing, where she acquired and published Neil Gaiman and Terry Pratchett's bestselling Good Omens. After another leave to have another child (Hillary, now 13), she began work as an agent with Russ Galen at Scovil Chicak Galen Literary Agency. She left the agency in 1999 to start her own firm, The McCarthy Agency, where she represents writers like Nicola Griffith, Robert Charles Wilson, Tanith Lee, Sarah Zettel, Wil McCarthy, Mark Anthony, Eric Flint, and many others. In her copious spare time, she is also the founding editor of the world's bestselling fantasy magazine, Realms of Fantasy, which features fiction from the industry's finest writers and nonfiction from its finest academics and essayists. She resides in the Suburb Time Forgot in New Jersey, and has been married since 1983 to artist/author Wayne Barlowe.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Shawna McCarthy. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #16

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Melanie Tem and Steve Rasnic Tem were writers-in-residence at Odyssey 2005. In their week at Odyssey, they discussed key writing concepts and techniques in a series of fascinating dialogues. This podcast is an excerpt from a dialogue on theme and idea. The Tems explain how theme and idea serve as the underpinnings of the story and provide the story with a reason for being written. What purpose or meaning do your stories have, beyond entertainment? Melanie challenges the notion that stories need only to entertain--shouldn't authors want to achieve something more? Isn't it disappointing when the characters and writing are good, but the story isn't about anything that matters? Steve wants to be moved, feel emotions, not just be entertained. He claims theme makes a story memorable. The Tems admit that theme usually sounds boring or silly when you say it out loud, which is why it's better to express the theme through a story. Melanie and Steve describe their different processes for developing theme as they write. Idea, on the other hand, is the practical element of story--the premise for the plot. The Tems share their methods of idea generation, exploring real answers to the classic question, "Where do you get your ideas?"

Melanie Tem and Steve Rasnic Tem The Tems' latest book is their collaboration The Man on the Ceiling, a reimagining of their award-winning novella into novel form, expanding on the themes of family, loss, and imagination, which Publishers' Weekly says "will draw in readers with delicate, exquisitely detailed and almost hypnotic language." John Clute says of it, "The Man on the Ceiling slaps mundanity in the face, because everything in the book speaks to us in every voice it is possible for us to hear."

Melanie's next solo novel is The Yellow Wood, out in January '09, a magical realism exploration of the father-daughter relationship and the struggle for a child to emancipate herself from the father she believes is a sorcerer.

Melanie Tem's previous solo novels are Prodigal (recipient of the Bram Stoker Award for Superior Achievement, First Novel), Blood Moon, Wilding, Revenant, Desmodus, The Tides, Black River, Pioneer, Slain in the Spirit, and The Deceiver. Collaborative novels are Making Love and Witch-Light with Nancy Holder and Daughters with Steve Rasnic Tem.

Stephen King said of her first novel, Prodigal, "spectacular, far better than anything by new writers in the hardcover field." Dan Simmons declared it "A cry from the very heart of the heart of darkness. . . . Melanie Tem may well be the literary successor to Shirley Jackson." David Morrell called her ghost novel Revenant, "Hauntingly beautiful. Achingly on target." And of Black River, her latest novel published by Headline in England, the British critics said "Fascinating, overwhelming, compelling . . . Melanie Tem is one hell of a writer" (SFX).

The chapbook The Man on the Ceiling, written with Steve Rasnic Tem, won the 2001 Bram Stoker, International Horror Guild, and World Fantasy Awards. The award-winning multi-media CD-ROM Imagination Box was also a collaborative project with Steve Rasnic Tem. Melanie Tem's short stories have appeared in anthologies, magazines, and in the collection The Ice Downstream. She has also published non-fiction articles and poetry.

Recipient of a 2001-2002 associateship from the Rocky Mountain Women's Institute, Tem is also writing plays. Her one-act "The Society for Lost Positives" has been produced in Denver, Salida, and Chicago.

Melanie has taught an extremely popular creative writing class at Westside Books in Denver. The class includes aspiring writers in all genres, some of whom are, she says, "on the verge of being published."

Also a social worker, Tem lives in Denver with her husband, writer and editor Steve Rasnic Tem. They have four children and three granddaughters.

Steve Rasnic Tem's next solo novel is Deadfall Hotel, out in November '09, a literary exploration of the roots of horror in the collective unconscious told through the story of a widower who takes the job of manager at a remote hotel where the guests are not quite like you and me, accompanied by his daughter and the ghost of his wife.

Over the space of three decades, Steve has become one of the best-published and most-respected crafters of short fiction in the field of the fantastic. His work appears in many hundreds of magazines and anthologies, both in the United States and around the globe. His short fiction has been compared to the work of Franz Kafka, Dino Buzzati, Ray Bradbury, and Raymond Carver, but to quote Joe R. Lansdale: "Steve Rasnic Tem is a school of writing unto himself." His 300 plus published pieces have garnered him the British Fantasy Award, World Fantasy Award, International Horror Guild Award, and Bram Stoker Award.

His novels include Excavation (Avon Books) and The Book of Days (Subterranean). His short stories have been collected in City Fishing (Silver Salamander), The Far Side of the Lake (Ash-Tree), and Ombres sur la Route (Denoel, France). A collection of his selected poetry, The Hydrocephalic Ward, appeared in 2003. His recent forays into the graphic arts have resulted in illustrations for Wormhole Books, multimedia work in Lone Wolf Publication's Steve and Melanie Tem's Imagination Box CD, and animation for the film festival circuit.

"His denouements leave one drained and figuratively gasping. Tem's greatest talent lies in his presentation of subtle, unspoken horrors to which the reader's imagination must supply the grotesque afterimages."
--Fantasy Review

"In little more than half a decade, Steve Tem has come to rival Dennis Etchison and Ramsey Campbell as a master of the psychological horror short story."
--Ed Bryant

"[Tem's] stories have the compression of poetry. He is able to create rapidly a mood of menace and revulsion."
--Publishers Weekly

For more information, visit http://www.m-s-tem.com.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2005 by Melanie Tem and Steve Rasnic Tem. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #15

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Patricia A. McKillip was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 1998. Patricia shared valuable advice on outlining, receiving critiques, revising, and generating themes. In an amazing lecture on fantastic landscapes, Patricia spoke about the need to make your landscape as vivid to the reader as the real world. In this podcast, Patricia explains how to transform details of real settings to make them into fantastic settings, and how such settings can be used in different genres, how they can mutate and transform. She stresses the many values of landscape: landscape can inspire story; landscape can serve as a character; landscape can mirror the state of mind of your protagonist; and the way your character sees the landscape can reveal much about that character. Patricia shares some of her brilliant descriptions and explains how they have been drawn from her life and travels. She illustrates how readers paint settings in their minds, and how landscape travels from memory into imagination. She explains that we must search for fictional landscapes within real experiences, and make the imaginative landscape more real than the real.

Patricia A. McKillip Patricia A. McKillip was born in Salem, Oregon, received an M.A. in English Lit. from San Jose State University in California, and has been a writer since then. She is primarily known for her fantasy, and has published novels both for adults and young adults. Her YA novel The Forgotten Beasts of Eld won the first World Fantasy Award in 1975. Among other YA fantasy novels are The Riddle-Master Trilogy, and The Changeling Sea, as well as the S/F duo, Moon-Flash and The Moon and the Face. Lately she has been publishing fantasy novels for adults, among them Winter Rose, and The Tower at Stony Wood, both of which received Nebula nominations. Other award-winning novels include Something Rich and Strange, which received a Mythopoeic Award, and Ombria in Shadow, which won both the Mythopoeic and the World Fantasy Award. She has also written a number of short stories through the years, both for adults and young adults; they were recently published in a collection titled Harrowing the Dragon. Her latest published novel is Solstice Wood, a contemporary sequel to Winter Rose. A new fantasy, The Bell at Sealey Head, will be published in September, 2008. She lives in Oregon with her husband, the poet David Lunde.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 1998 by Patricia A. McKillip. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #14

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Thomas F. Monteleone was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2002. Tom led the class in a terrific writing exercise, discussed his experiences as writer, editor, and publisher, and offered lots of valuable insights. In this podcast, Tom discusses how a writer can approach the task of writing for anthologies. Theme anthologies may have stupid or brilliant premises. They may focus on topics that don't inspire or excite you. How can you get excited about the idea and write something that will fit into the anthology yet also be true to who you are as a writer? Considering how many writers are submitting to the anthology, how can you come up with an original idea? Tom also discusses the problem from the other side, as an anthology editor receiving clichéd submissions, even from pros. Both writer and editor are searching for fresh takes on familiar ideas, for stories that take stale ideas where they haven't gone before. Tom explains how inspiration can come from the most stupid, mundane sources, how ideas must percolate, and why you often need to throw out your first, second, and third ideas before you get to something fresh. Only by asking the next question and pushing the envelope can you tell a story that hasn't been told before.

Thomas F. Monteleone Tom Monteleone has been a professional writer since 1972, and four-time winner of the Bram Stoker Award. He has published more than 100 short stories in numerous magazines and anthologies. His stories have been nominated for many awards, and have appeared in lots of best-of-the-year compilations. His notorious column of opinion and entertainment, The Mothers and Fathers Italian Association, currently appears in Cemetery Dance magazine. He is the editor of seven anthologies, including the highly acclaimed Borderlands series edited with his wife, Elizabeth, of which, Borderlands 5, won a Bram Stoker Award in 2003.

He has written for the stage and television, having scripts produced for American Playhouse (which won him the Bronze Award at the International TV and Film Festival of New York and the Gabriel Award), George Romero's Tales from the Darkside, and a series on Fox TV entitled Night Visions. He has written many feature-length screenplays, none of which have been produced, but have made him plenty of money anyway.

Of his thirty-six books, his novel, The Blood of the Lamb received the 1993 Bram Stoker Award, and The New York Times Notable Book of the Year Award. His three collections of selected short fiction are Dark Stars and Other Illuminations (1981), Rough Beasts and Other Mutations (2003), The Little Brown Book of Bizarre Stories (2004), and Fearful Symmetries (2004),which won the 2004 Bram Stoker Award. His novels, The Resurrectionist and Night of Broken Souls, global thrillers from Warner Books, received rave reviews and have been optioned for films. The Reckoning (2000), a sequel to The Blood of the Lamb, and The Eyes of the Virgin (2002) have been published by Forge. His omnibus volume of essays about the book and film industries entitled The Mothers and Fathers Italian Association was recently published by Borderlands Press (www.borderlandspress.com) and won the 2003 Bram Stoker Award for Non-Fiction. He is also the author of the bestseller The Complete Idiot's Guide to Writing a Novel (2004) and is currently at work on his latest novel, a thriller entitled Submerged. His books and stories have been translated into twelve foreign languages. He's a writer—please don't call him an "author."

He likes baseball, the Baltimore Ravens, computers, sour mash whiskey, fine wines, comic books, tons of books to read, all kinds of music (except the stuff sung by people wearing big hats or pants down to their knees), and teaching his daughter how to be an independent thinker. Despite being dragged kicking and screaming into his sixties (and losing his hair), he still thinks he is dashingly handsome—humor him. With his wife, Elizabeth, and daughter, Olivia, he recently moved from the frozen tundras (is there any other kind?) of New Hampshire to the rolling hills of Maryland.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2002 by Thomas F. Monteleone. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #13

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Rodman Philbrick was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2007. Rod shared his fascinating experiences as a writer in many different genres and taught students several powerful techniques to create suspense. In this podcast, Rod explains the importance of bringing the point of view (POV) close to the protagonist and creating a translucent reading experience. Rod discusses the necessity of getting into the head of your POV character, feeling what he's feeling, experiencing what he's experiencing, and then leaving most of that out. The writer must carefully decide what to include and what to hold back. Rod explains how to use POV to earn the reader's trust and confidence on the first page, to draw the reader in, and to make it all look effortless. He reviews the changes in POV over the last fifty years, how these affect reader expectations, and the problems of using omniscient viewpoint today.

Rodman Philbrick Rodman Philbrick grew up on the coast of New Hampshire and has been writing novels since the age of sixteen. For a number of years he published mystery and suspense novels for adults. Two of his Florida-based detective novels were nominated for the Shamus Award. Brothers & Sinners finally won the Shamus outright in 1993.

That same year Scholastic published his first book for young readers. Freak the Mighty was made into the feature film The Mighty, starring Sharon Stone. Since then, he has won numerous awards and honors, including the prestigious California Young Reader's Medal, the Arizona Young Reader's Award, the Washington D.C. 'Capital Choice' Award and the New York State 'Charlotte' Award. Freak the Mighty has become a standard reading selection n thousands of classrooms worldwide, and has more than a million copies in print.

Philbrick's award-winning science fiction novel The Last Book in the Universe is read in many schools. His most recent novel for young readers, The Young Man and the Sea, draws upon his youthful experiences as a boat builder, and his vivid memories of growing up in a small town on the coast of New England. Working from a theme made famous by Ernest Hemingway, the story follows the thrilling boy-against-the-sea adventure of twelve-year-old Skiff Beaman, who risks his life to save his family by venturing far offshore in a small boat in search of the fabled giant bluefin tuna. It has been optioned by John Goldschmidt at Viva Films.

Other works for young readers by Rodman Philbrick include Max the Mighty, The Fire Pony, the fantasy novel REM World, and The Journal of Douglas Allen Deeds. The Mostly True Adventures of Homer P. Figg will be published by Scholastic in 2009.

With Lynn Harnett, he wrote The Werewolf Chronicles trilogy, The Visitors science-fiction trilogy, and The House on Cherry Street horror trilogy.

Philbrick has also written the adult historical horror novel Coffins (Tor, 2002).

Under the name William R. Dantz, Philbrick published the science thrillers Pulse, The Seventh Sleeper, Hunger, and Nine Levels Down.

Writing for adult readers as Chris Jordan, Philbrick is publishing three hardcover thrillers with Mira Books. The first, Taken, was their lead title in July 2006. Publishers Weekly says that "Jordan's full-throttle style makes this an emotionally rewarding thriller that moves like lightning." The second, Trapped, was published in November 2007.

Philbrick has published numerous short stories in anthologies, including Tomorrowland, The Ultimate Dracula, and Dracula: Prince of Darkness.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2007 by Rodman Philbrick. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #12

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Michael A. Arnzen was a guest lecturer at Odyssey 2007. Michael led the class in a wild exercise that revealed some of the qualities that make us laugh and discussed the fascinating connections between humor and horror. In this fun and illuminating podcast, Mike explores the characteristics of humor. What qualities are necessary for humor? When is the weird and gross funny? Mike reads his amazing story "Domestic Fowl" and discusses how you can develop a comic perspective, how to be funny without trying, and how to make humor arise organically out of your story. How is a funny story different than a joke? What joys does comedy provide the reader?

Michael A. Arnzen Michael Arnzen has been publishing outrageous horror fiction, SF, poetry, literary criticism, instructional essays on writing, and offbeat humor since 1989. Across his career, Arnzen has won three Bram Stoker Awards, an International Horror Guild Award, and several "Year's Best Horror Story" accolades and reprints. His books include the novels Play Dead and Grave Markings. Particularly known for his flash fiction (the best of which is collected in 100 Jolts: Shockingly Short Stories) and twisted short poems (published in seven chapbooks, including the Stoker-winning collection Freakcidents), the book Horror Fiction: An Introduction deemed Arnzen "the master of minimalist horror." Always the experimentalist, his writing has appeared on Palm Pilots and postcards, short art films ("Exquisite Corpse") and creepy online animation. His latest novel, Play Dead, even inspired a deck of custom-designed playing cards.

When he's not writing, Arnzen teaches suspense and horror writing full-time in the Masters degree program in Writing Popular Fiction at Seton Hill University, near Pittsburgh, PA. He holds a Ph.D. in English from the University of Oregon, where he studied "the uncanny" in popular culture, as well as an M.A. in English from the University of Idaho, where he wrote his second novel. Arnzen sits on the editorial board for two literary journals associated with genre fiction (Paradoxa and Dissections) and advises his college's literary magazine, Eye Contact.

Arnzen's most recent works are Proverbs for Monsters (a full-length short story collection) and Audiovile (fiction readings set to music on CD). Look for "Degrees of Dread"--his essay on horror, writer's workshops, and academia--in the recently published edition of On Writing Horror (ed. Mort Castle, Writer's Digest Books, November 2006).

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2007 by Michael A. Arnzen. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2008 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #11

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Michael A. Burstein was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2007. Michael led the class in a lively question-and-answer session focused on the key ingredients of science fiction and fantasy and shared his experiences as a writer of short fiction. In this podcast, Michael explores plot and describes the plot skeleton. What is the appeal of an "unplotted" story? What are the advantages of a "plotted" story, and specifically of a story that uses the plot skeleton? Why is this basic construction so powerful? Michael leads you step by step through the plot skeleton, beginning with a character in a context with a problem and building as the character struggles to solve the problem. Michael also discusses how to make the reader care and how a character's reaction to a problem reveals his nature.

Michael A. Burstein Michael A. Burstein was born in New York City in 1970, and grew up in the neighborhood of Forest Hills in the borough of Queens. He attended Hunter College High School in Manhattan. In 1991 he graduated from Harvard College with a degree in Physics, and in 1993 he earned a Master's in Physics from Boston University. In 1994 he attended the Clarion Science Fiction and Fantasy Writer's Workshop.

Burstein's first published story, "TeleAbsence," which appeared in the July 1995 issue of Analog, was nominated for the Hugo Award and was chosen by the readers of Analog as the best short story published by the magazine in 1995. Two years later, Burstein won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer at the 1997 World Science Fiction Convention, LoneStarCon2. Burstein subsequently received Hugo nominations for "Broken Symmetry," "Cosmic Corkscrew," "Kaddish for the Last Survivor," (also a Nebula nominee) "Spaceships," "Paying It Forward," "Decisions, "Time Ablaze," "Seventy-Five Years," "TelePresence," and a Nebula and Sturgeon nomination for "Reality Check." His novella "Sanctuary" (Analog, September 2005) was chosen by the readers of Analog as the best novella published by the magazine in 2005. From 1998 to 2000, Burstein served as Secretary of Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America.

Burstein lives with his wife Nomi in the town of Brookline, Massachusetts, where he is an elected Town Meeting Member and Library Trustee. He has worked as a Science teacher at all levels and currently edits Science textbooks for middle school and high school. He has given lectures and spoken at various science fiction conferences and libraries, and to groups at MIT and Harvard.

More information on Burstein and his work can be found on his webpage, http://www.mabfan.com, or via his electronic newsletter, MABFAN.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2007 by Michael A. Burstein. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #10

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Nina Kiriki Hoffman was the writer-in-residence at Odyssey in the summer of 2007. During her week at Odyssey, Nina had individual conferences with students, participated in the daily workshopping of student manuscripts, and gave some fascinating and informative lectures. This podcast comes from her lecture on writing for teens. In it, Nina describes what qualities teens are looking for in their fiction and how a writer can provide those qualities. What makes YA fiction special? Nina explores the challenges involved in writing a teenage protagonist and suggests ways to get in touch with your own teen memories and experiences. She explains how to use teens for research and what to look for when observing teens. She also discusses what publishers of YA fiction are looking for.

Nina Kiriki Hoffman Over the past twenty-five years, Nina Kiriki Hoffman has sold novels, juvenile and media tie-in books, short story collections, and more than 250 short stories. Her works have been finalists for the Nebula, World Fantasy, Sturgeon, Philip K. Dick, and Endeavour awards.

Her novel The Thread That Binds the Bones (Avon) won a Bram Stoker Award for first novel. Her other long works include The Silent Strength of Stones from Avon, A Red Heart of Memories, Past the Size of Dreaming, and A Fistful of Sky from Ace, A Stir of Bones and Spirits That Walk in Shadow from Viking, and Catalyst, from Tachyon. Her third short story collection, Time Travelers, Ghosts, and Other Visitors, was published by Five Star in 2003. A Stir of Bones, also 2003, made the American Library Association list of recommended books for the teen reader, and was selected by the New York Public Library as a best book for the teen reader. Stir was also a finalist for the Stoker Award.

Hoffman has also written in other people's universes, selling several books to R. L. Stine's Ghosts of Fear Street series for middle-grade readers, one Sweet Valley Junior High novel, and a Star Trek: Voyager book written in collaboration with Dean Wesley Smith and Kristine Kathryn Rusch.

Nina does production work for the Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction, teaches short story writing through her local community college, and works at a bookstore. She also works with teen writers. She taught the first week of Clarion 2004, was a featured writer at Odyssey in 2007, has presented at a number of writers' conferences, and, as a lifelong learner, enjoys sharing what she knows with other writers. She is a member of the Eugene Wordos weekly workshop.

Her hobbies include photography, exploring, and singing and playing old time country music. She lives in Eugene, Oregon, with several cats, a mannequin, and many strange toys.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2007 by Nina Kiriki Hoffman. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #9

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Robert J. Sawyer was the writer-in-residence at Odyssey in the summer of 2006. Rob participated in a week of workshopping student manuscripts, met individually with students, and offered energetic, insightful daily lectures. This podcast comes from his lecture "Is your science-fiction element extraneous?" In it, Rob explores the nature of genre. What should a genre story do that a regular story doesn't? How do you know whether your story should be told as a genre story or as a mainstream fiction story? When are fantastical elements critical to a story and when are they just props? Rob explains that science fiction and fantasy elements should take a story to another level, by amplifying or concentrating elements of our world through a distorting mirror.

Robert J. Sawyer, Photo by Carolyn Clink Robert J. Sawyer--called "the dean of Canadian science fiction" by the Ottawa Citizen and "just about the best science-fiction writer out there" by the Denver Rocky Mountain News--is one of only seven authors in history to win all three of the science-fiction field's top awards for best novel of the year: the Hugo, which he won for Hominids; the Nebula, which he won for The Terminal Experiment; and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, which he won for Mindscan.

Rob has won Japan's Seiun Award for best foreign novel three times (for End of an Era, Frameshift, and Illegal Alien), and he's also won the world's largest cash-prize for SF writing--the Polytechnic University of Catalonia's 6,000-euro Premio UPC de Ciencia Ficción--an unprecedented three times, as well. In addition, he's won nine Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Awards ("Auroras"), an Arthur Ellis Award from the Crime Writers of Canada, Analog magazine's Analytical Laboratory Award for Best Short Story of the Year, and the Science Fiction Chronicle Reader Award for Best Short Story of the Year.

Rob's novels are top-ten national mainstream bestsellers in Canada, appearing on the Globe and Mail and Maclean's bestsellers' lists, and they've hit number one on the bestsellers' list published by Locus, the U.S. trade journal of the SF field. He has taught SF writing at the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, and the Banff Centre for the Arts, and was writer-in-residence at Odyssey in 2006. In addition, he edits the Robert J. Sawyer Books imprint for Calgary's Red Deer Press, and was the first SF writer to have a web site: www.sfwriter.com.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Robert J. Sawyer. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #8

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Elizabeth Hand is a frequent guest lecturer at Odyssey. In the summer of 2005, Liz shared some of the most valuable writing advice she had collected over the years and led students in a writing exercise that generated some amazing material. One student, Jason Ridler, went on to develop his material into a complete story, "A Different Shade of Knight," recently published in the anthology Bash Down the Door and Slice Open the Bad Guy. In a lecture on using personal experience in fiction writing, Liz discussed various authors who have incorporated personal experiences in their fiction and others who haven't, and she explored the consequences of that, the different qualities such works have. In this podcast, Liz ennumerates different ways personal experiences can enrich, guide, and strengthen fiction. She describes how to absorb details in the everyday and find characters, plots, and other elements for your fiction. Those details can be recast in another frame--in a science fiction or fantasy story. Liz also points out how specialized, real-world knowledge that you have can enliven your stories and provide vivid details. Finally, she guides you in the writing exercise that led to Jason Ridler's published story. See what the exercise does for you!

Elizabeth Hand Writer and critic Elizabeth Hand is the author of nine novels, including the Shakespearean fantasy Illyria and the psychological thriller Generation Loss, and three story collections, Saffron & Brimstone: Strange Stories, Bibliomancy: Four Novellas (winner of the 2004 World Fantasy Award) and Last Summer at Mars Hill. Her fiction has received numerous awards, including an Individual Artist's Fellowship from the Maine Arts Commission/NEA. She is a longtime contributor to the Washington Post Book World and the Village Voice, and her reviews and essays have appeared in a number of other publications, including Salon, DownEast, and Fantasy & Science Fiction (where she is a columnist). She has also written numerous novelizations and a popular series of Star Wars juveniles. She lives on the coast of Maine with her two children and her partner, UK critic John Clute.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2005 by Elizabeth Hand. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #7

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Christopher Golden was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2006. Chris led students through an energizing writing exercise and offered some wonderful advice based on his experiences in publishing. In a lecture on setting the scene, Chris discussed the importance of controlling the reader's emotions and explained how creating a vivid scene can help the author do this without the reader realizing it. In this podcast, Chris explores the key elements involved in setting the scene and how they help the reader to experience the scene in an immediate and emotional way. He discusses the importance of atmosphere, mood, and texture and describes how to create them. He explains how sensory details can show the reader how to feel rather than telling the reader how to feel.

Christopher Golden Christopher Golden is the award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as The Myth Hunters, Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and The Borderkind. Golden co-wrote the lavishly illustrated novel Baltimore, or, The Steadfast Tin Soldier and the Vampire with Mike Mignola.

He has also written books for teens and young adults, including the thriller series Body of Evidence, honored by the New York Public Library and chosen as one of YALSA's Best Books for Young Readers. Upcoming teen novels include Poison Ink for Delacorte and Soulless for MTV Books.

With Thomas E. Sniegoski, he is the co-author of the dark fantasy series The Menagerie as well as the young readers' fantasy series OutCast and the comic book miniseries Talent, both of which were recently acquired by Universal Pictures. Golden and Sniegoski also wrote the upcoming comic book miniseries The Sisterhood, currently in development as a feature film. Golden authored several original Hellboy novels, including The Lost Army and The Bones of Giants, and edited two Hellboy short story anthologies.

Working with actress/writer/director Amber Benson, he co-created and co-wrote Ghosts of Albion, an original animated supernatural drama for BBC Online, from which they created the book series of the same name.

Golden was born and raised in Massachusetts, where he still lives with his family. He graduated from Tufts University. He has recently completed The Lost Ones, part three of a dark fantasy trilogy for Bantam Books entitled The Veil. At present he is collaborating with Tim Lebbon on Mind the Gap, the first novel in their series The Hidden Cities. There are more than eight million copies of his books in print. Please visit him at www.christophergolden.com.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Christopher Golden. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #6

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Terry Bisson was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 1999. Terry shared his experiences with the business end of writing and provided some great insights on students' stories. In a lecture on setting, Terry talked about the importance that setting has in a story and the many effects that can radiate from setting. In this podcast, Terry defines setting and discusses its key position as the point of access for the reader. He explains how setting establishes the tone and makes the first impression. Terry discusses setting as fictional dream, setting as metaphor for the character's life, setting as metaphor for theme or plot. Terry provides advice on fleshing out your setting and creating belief in the reader.

Terry Bisson Terry Bisson is the author of a dozen or so SF books, most recently Greetings and Numbers Don't Lie from San Francisco's Tachyon Publications. He is perhaps best known for his short stories: "Bears Discover Fire" swept every honor in the SF field in 1990-91, including the Nebula, Hugo and Locus awards, and "macs" did almost as well in 2000, winning a Nebula and France's Gran Prix de l'Imaginaire. "They're Made out of Meat" has been made into a prize-winning short film.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 1999 by Terry Bisson. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #5

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Melissa Scott was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2003. Melissa led the class in a fascinating writing exercise and shared her experiences as a writer. In a lecture on world building, Melissa described her techniques for creating a vivid, fully realized, believable world. In this podcast, Melissa outlines the decisions you need to make, in the order you need to make them, to build a strong, internally consistent world. She discusses the effect that one element can have on another, how your world can lead to your plot, and how seeming contradictions in the world can be useful to create conflict.

Melissa Scott Melissa Scott is from Little Rock, Arkansas, and studied history at Harvard College and Brandeis University, where she earned her Ph.D. in the comparative history program with a dissertation titled "The Victory of the Ancients: Tactics, Technology, and the Use of Classical Precedent." In 1986, she won the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer, and in 2001 she and her late partner and long-time collaborator Lisa A. Barnett won the Lambda Literary Award in SF/Fantasy/Horror for Point of Dreams. Scott has also won Lammies in 1996 for Shadow Man and 1995 for Trouble and Her Friends, having previously been a three-time finalist (for Mighty Good Road, Dreamships, and Burning Bright). Trouble and Her Friends was also shortlisted for the Tiptree. Her most recent solo novel, The Jazz, was named to Locus's Recommended Reading List for 2000. Her first work of nonfiction, Conceiving the Heavens: Creating the Science Fiction Novel, was published by Heinemann in 1997, and her monologue, "At RaeDean's Funeral," has been included in an off-off-Broadway production, Elvis Dreams, as well as several other evenings of Elvis-mania. A second monologue, "Job Hunting," has been performed in competition and as a part of an evening of Monologues from the Road. Her most recent publications are the short stories "The Rocky Side of the Sky" (in Periphery, Alice Street) and "Mister Seeley" (in So Fey, Haworth Press).

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2003 by Melissa Scott. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #4

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Robert J. Sawyer was the writer-in-residence at Odyssey in the summer of 2006. Rob participated in a week of workshopping student manuscripts, met individually with students, and offered energetic, insightful daily lectures. In this podcast, from his lecture on point of view, Rob explains why a strong, consistent point of view is so important and describes the advantages of third-person limited omniscient. He also provides some great exercises that allow you to test yourself and see if you can spot POV violations.

Robert J. Sawyer, Photo by Carolyn Clink Robert J. Sawyer--called "the dean of Canadian science fiction" by the Ottawa Citizen and "just about the best science-fiction writer out there" by the Denver Rocky Mountain News--is one of only seven authors in history to win all three of the science-fiction field's top awards for best novel of the year: the Hugo, which he won for Hominids; the Nebula, which he won for The Terminal Experiment; and the John W. Campbell Memorial Award, which he won for Mindscan.

Rob has won Japan's Seiun Award for best foreign novel three times (for End of an Era, Frameshift, and Illegal Alien), and he's also won the world's largest cash-prize for SF writing--the Polytechnic University of Catalonia's 6,000-euro Premio UPC de Ciencia Ficción--an unprecedented three times, as well. In addition, he's won nine Canadian Science Fiction and Fantasy Awards ("Auroras"), an Arthur Ellis Award from the Crime Writers of Canada, Analog magazine's Analytical Laboratory Award for Best Short Story of the Year, and the Science Fiction Chronicle Reader Award for Best Short Story of the Year.

Rob's novels are top-ten national mainstream bestsellers in Canada, appearing on the Globe and Mail and Maclean's bestsellers' lists, and they've hit number one on the bestsellers' list published by Locus, the U.S. trade journal of the SF field. He has taught SF writing at the University of Toronto, Ryerson University, and the Banff Centre for the Arts, and was writer-in-residence at Odyssey in 2006. In addition, he edits the Robert J. Sawyer Books imprint for Calgary's Red Deer Press, and was the first SF writer to have a web site: www.sfwriter.com.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Robert J. Sawyer. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #3

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Gardner Dozois was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2004. Gardner shared his insider perspective as an editor as well as his experiences as a writer. In a lecture on how to get your short fiction published, Gardner described how the magazine business works, what magazine editors are looking for, and what factors go into an editor's decision to acquire or reject a story. In this podcast, Gardner discusses what to include in a cover letter and what to exclude. He also explains the common mistakes writers make in approaching publishers and how to make a good impression.

Gardner Dozois, Photo by Susan Casper Gardner Dozois was the editor of Asimov's Science Fiction magazine for almost twenty years (which, under his editorship, won the Locus Award as Best Magazine an unprecedented fifteen years in a row), and also edits the annual anthology series The Year's Best Science Fiction, now up to its Twenty-Fourth Annual Collection (and which has won the Locus Award for Best Anthology sixteen times, more than any other anthology series in history). He's won the Hugo Award fifteen times as the year's Best Editor, won the Locus Award thirty times, including an unprecedented sixteen times in a row as Best Editor, and has won the Nebula Award twice for his own short fiction. He is the author or editor of more than a hundred books, among the most recent of which are The Best of the Best: Twenty Years of The Year's Best Science Fiction and The Best of the Best 2: Twenty Years of the Best Science Fiction Short Novels. Coming up are two huge original anthologies, The New Space Opera (with Jonathan Strahan) and Wizards: Magical Tales from the Masters of Modern Fantasy (with Jack Dann). Born in Salem, Massachusetts, he now lives in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2004 by Gardner Dozois. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #2

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Jeff VanderMeer was a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2006. Jeff led the class in some wonderful writing exercises and shared his perspective as a writer, editor, and publisher. In a lecture on why fantasy is important, Jeff explained why fantasy fiction can explore present-day truths more effectively than mainstream fiction. In this podcast, Jeff discusses how to approach writing fantasy, the sensibility of fantasy, the importance of theme in fantasy, and the role of the autobiographical element in fantasy. He describes how to create surrealism through extreme detail, and how to find the fantastic in the mundane.

Jeff VanderMeer Jeff VanderMeer is a two-time winner (six-time finalist) of the World Fantasy Award, as well as a past finalist for the Hugo Award, the Philip K. Dick Award, the International Horror Guild Award, the British Fantasy Award, the Bram Stoker Award, and the Theodore Sturgeon Memorial Award. VanderMeer is the author of several surreal/magic realist novels and story collections, including City of Saints & Madmen, Veniss Underground, and Shriek: An Afterword, published by Pan Macmillan, Tor Books, and Bantam Books, among others. His fiction has been published in 20 countries. VanderMeer's most recent books have made the year's best lists of Publishers Weekly, The San Francisco Chronicle, The Los Angeles Weekly, Publishers' News, and Amazon.com. He is the recipient of an NEA-funded Florida Individual Artist Fellowship for excellence in fiction (1995-96) and a Florida Artist Enhancement Grant (2004-2005). In 2001, Locus Online named him one of the ten best speculative fiction writers in the world. International bestselling author Peter Straub has called his work "brilliant...playful, poignant, and utterly, wildly, imaginative, while CNN.com has called it "Darkly distinctive! Not to be missed!"

In addition to his fiction, VanderMeer is an active editor and nonfiction writer. VanderMeer has edited three volumes of the World Fantasy Award-winning Leviathan original fiction anthology series he founded, and Mapping the Beast, a best-of volume is due for release in late 2007. His The Thackery T. Lambshead Pocket Guide to Eccentric & Discredited Diseases is a wildly successful fake disease guide still in print to this day. Upcoming anthology projects include serving as a guest editor for the Best American Fantasy series, and co-editor of a New Weird anthology and a Steampunk anthology, among others.

He currently lives in Tallahassee, Florida, with his wife, Ann. He is 38 years old.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2006 by Jeff VanderMeer. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.




PODCAST #1

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We were very fortunate to have author Charles L. Grant as a guest lecturer at Odyssey in the summer of 2000. Charlie provided some great feedback to students on their manuscripts and generously shared the struggles and successes he'd experienced in his career. In a lecture on characterization, Charlie offered some invaluable insights and provided concrete, practical tips. This was his last teaching engagement before he died in 2006.

Charles L. Grant, Photo by Robert Maslowski In this podcast, Charlie discusses the importance of visualizing your characters, the methods by which you can describe your characters without interrupting the flow of your story, the dangers of overpopulating your story with characters, and the way in which setting functions as a character.

We are honored to present this excerpt as our inaugural podcast, as a tribute to Charlie's life and his contribution to the field.

Charles L. Grant was born in 1942 and lived most of his life in northwestern New Jersey. In 1964 he graduated from Trinity College (Connecticut) with a B.A. in History/English. From that point until 1975 he taught English, history, and drama in public secondary schools, with a two-year interruption (1968-1970) for military service (US Army, MP, Qui Nhon, Vietnam). He traveled extensively throughout the United States and Europe, and since 1975 was a full-time writer and editor.

Charlie wrote over 100 books and 200 short stories, and was best known for his dark fantasy and quiet horror. He also wrote in other genres using the pseudonyms Geoffrey Marsh, Felicia Andrews, Simon Lake, Lionel Fenn, and Deborah Lewis. His work was nominated for over 20 awards. He received two Nebula Awards, three World Fantasy Awards, the British Fantasy Society's Special Award, for life achievement, the Horror Writers Association's Lifetime Achievement Award, and the World Horror Convention's Grandmaster Award.

Charlie edited Shadows, an award-winning series of anthologies that came out between 1978 and 1991. Contributors included Stephen King, R. A. Lafferty, Ramsey Campbell, Melanie Tem, and Steve Rasnic Tem.

Charlie married writer and editor Kathryn Ptacek in February, 1982.

Charles L. Grant, Photo by Kathryn Ptacek In connection with his writing and editing, he appeared on numerous radio and television programs both in the US and Great Britain, and lectured at many schools and colleges on the genre of dark fantasy, editing, writing, and the business of his profession.

He also served eight years as an officer of the Science Fiction Writers of America, served ten years on the Board of Directors of the World Fantasy Awards, was president of the Horror Writers of America, served five years as President of the Board of Trustees of HWA, and was on the board of advisors for The Burry Man's Writers Center.

He died at home on September 15, 2006. His wife, Kathy, and brother, Jack, were with him.

The text of this recording is copyright (c) 2000 by Charles L. Grant. The sound recording is copyright (p) 2007 by Odyssey Writing Workshops.


 

 

 


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