Night and Day
I am not a foreign correspondent. A foreign correspondent is someone who lives in foreign parts and corresponds, usually in the form of essays containing no new facts. I am a fireman. I go to fires. -- Wagner


Night and Day was first performed at London's Phoenix Theatre in November 1978. The production was directed by Peter Wood and designed by Carl Toms.

THE CAST

GEORGE GUTHRIE -- William Marlowe
RUTH CARSON -- Diana Rigg
ALASTAIR CARSON -- John Bentley/Andrew Parris
DICK WAGNER -- John Thaw
JACON MILNE -- Peter Machin
GEOFFREY CARSON -- David Langton
PRESIDENT MAGEEBA -- Oly Jacobs
FRANCIS -- George Harris

SYNOPSIS

Tom Stoppard's stimulating, funny play Night and Day is set in a fictional black African country, Kambawe, which is ruled by a leader not unlike Idi Amin. The nation is faced with a Soviet-backed revolution which quickly brings newsmen from around the world to cover the story. Using the characters Ruth; her huband, Geoffrey Carson, a mine owner; an Australian veteran reporter, Dick Wagner; and an idealistic young journalist, Jacob Milne, Stoppard pits the ideal of a Free Press against that of working-class solidarity. During the course of the play, each character is given an opportuniity to make his case heard as the revolution unfolds. -- From the 1979 Grove Press Edition

THE CRITICS SPEAK

"In his new play, Tom Stoppard turns in his license as a brilliant comedian of ideas for a new 'seriousnes'...Night and Day shows this dazzling playwright very much in transition" Jack Kroll, Newsweek

"Night and Day finds Stoppard in an interesting transitional phase where, without shelving his own mad cap, he is trying on Bernard Shaw's dialectical beard." T.E. Kalem, Time

Reviews from:
culturevulture
CurtainUp!
TheaterMania

FOR FURTHER EXPLORATION

ONLINE

Program Notes from ACT-- Big package of stuff -- synopsis, interview, essays -- in PDF format. Highly recommended.

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Last modified 5/22/04 by Michael Berry
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